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The Safety Leader Podcast

The Safety Leader Podcast introduces the next level in safety. A safety leader takes safety beyond rules compliance to a shared goal that recognizes the importance of each individual on the job. Supervisors and safety people are uniquely positioned to become safety leaders and to bring workplace safety past compliance and across the threshold to where safety becomes personal. The front line is where the culture of an organization is made and reinforced. Past all the processes and procedures are people. Safety starts with people. I commit to you to give you my best ideas, tips and strategies to help make your job as a supervisor or front-line safety person easier and more effective. That's what the Safety Leader Podcast is all about.
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Sep 24, 2017

On this episode, we are going to look at four different ways that you can connect safety to leadership. Leadership is not forced or thrust upon anyone. It’s voluntary. And personal safety leadership builds great teams.

A commitment to teamwork and safety. It’s all you need to go from newbie or lowly front-liner to leader. To become a safety leader requires a commitment to the welfare of your teammates. You can't build a strong team without caring about the safety of the members of the team. In this way, you can use safety build leadership in safety and teamwork.

 

Here are four ways that you can connect teamwork and leadership to safety.

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Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs.

Sep 18, 2017

www.KevBurns.com

To be a safety leader, you have to be not only better at the job than the others, but willing to pick yourself up when you stumble. Coming up, three reasons safety leaders stumble.

The best organizations give world-class safety performance. They don't do it with a mediocre effort, mediocre standards or mediocre supervisors and safety people. They do it by surpassing industry average targets, a focused engagement with employees and with safety people and supervisors on top of their game.

 

You don’t build championship teams by shooting for the middle of industry averages. You don’t instill a positive safety culture by settling for average performance. World-class safety is not achieved by a mediocre effort, standards or people who don’t seek to be exceptional. 

Here's the problem. Not every safety person is a high-performer. 

Here are three main reasons that many stumble in their pursuit of becoming safety leaders.

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Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of |PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety.| He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs.

Sep 10, 2017

www.KevBurns.com

You may not be talking about it, but you have to. On this episode, get your people engaged in safety by talking about four things at your safety meeting.

Safety meetings started out as a legal requirement. You had to have them, they had to be recorded and the subject matter had to satisfy the Code. But nowhere does it state that you can’t add items to the safety meeting or that you can’t have fun and to speak-up in the meetings.

The problem is, safety meetings traditionally focus on meeting the legal requirement of the code. That's it. No more. So, to make sure they meet the bare minimum of the code, companies buy templates for their safety meetings that are white-bread and innocuous checklists because they’ve been dumbed-down to appeal to as many industries as possible.

Employees don’t buy-in to the safety program because it is presented as a set of rules and policies. Employees resist anyone who appears to want to force them to comply. And it's tough for employees to warm up to someone who incessantly talks about procedures, processes, inspections, and incidents.

To change the perception of safety, you must change the conversations. Here are 4 things you should be talking about in safety meetings.

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Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs.

Sep 3, 2017

www.KevBurns.com

On this episode, we are going to tackle complacency creep as we look at the Top 4 Strategies to Stop Safety Complacency Creep before it takes hold in your workplace.

Who could have ever foreseen that you could get so good at your work that complacency would become a safety issue? Safety processes and procedures are done so well that your crews have become exceptional safety performers. And because they do work they can be proud of, they take satisfaction in how well they do the job. That satisfaction can create complacency.

The longer crews work on the job together, the more they get into a kind of rhythm working together. But that rhythm can become a routine. And where there is routine, there is rote: doing the job robotically. “Auto-pilot.”

Complacency is not something that is fixed or repaired or even addressed at the senior management level. Complacency is addressed at the ultra-local level; at the front-line between supervisor and employee. That’s where the complacency takes place. That’s where it gets fixed.

To effectively take on complacency-creep, here are four strategies to arrest it before complacency begins to creep in.

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Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs.

Aug 27, 2017

www.KevBurns.com

Safety leadership is not just for those with a title. On this episode, we will talk about 6 Ways To Become A Respected Safety Leader.

To become a safety leader, you have to first understand what safety leadership is not: it is not safety management. Since there is no requirement to be in management to be a leader, then it only makes sense that you don’t have to be in safety management to be a safety leader.

Safety leadership is not just for those with a title. Safety leaders can be found on the front-lines too. They are willing to coach and inspire better safety performance through mosty, their example. You see, being a leader starts with being willing to go first. The first person to do something is the leader. Everyone else follows. But to go from safety person to safety leader, requires a mindset shift.

So with that in mind, let's explore six mindset shifts that can cause you to become a better safety leader:
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Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs.

Aug 20, 2017

www.KevBurns.com

Safety is fast-becoming the new leadership. So consider this a primer. On this episode, we will connect safety to leadership in seven different ways.

Leadership has nothing to do with management. Safety leadership, therefore, has nothing to do with safety management. You don’t have to be in management to be a leader.

Leadership is not a position. It is an attitude - management is the position. One has nothing to do with the other. 

Companies are waking up to the fact that people who blindly follow orders on a job site still get hurt. Helping people to connect with their own leadership abilities can help people to think more clearly on the job. It is for this reason that in the workplace, safety is fast-becoming the new leadership.

Look at any list of leadership traits and you will see a direct relationship to the list of traits of outstanding safety performers. So let's explore those. Here are the list of 7 character traits that solid safety leaders will possess.

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Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety. He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs.

Aug 7, 2017

www.KevbUnrs.com

Safety meetings are not supposed to be boring, but they are. So, on this episode, we'll explore two big problems with boring safety meetings and three strategies to fix them.

Safety complacency is a big problem today but never moreso than safety meeting complacency: the lack of focused engagement in preparing engaging safety meetings. Safety folks don't invest any time or effort into fixing their meetings. They are complacent with the way things are. Attendees are bored and disengaged in safety meetings but nothing seems to change. Isn't that the very definition of complacency.

But the whole conversation about complacent safety people will have to wait for another episode. This episode is going to focus on the 2 problems and real reasons safety meetings are traditionally so boring and then follow up with three strategies to overcome the problems and help you build better, engaging and focused safety meetings.

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Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs. www.KevBurns.com/peoplework

 

Jul 31, 2017

www.KevBurns.com

On this episode, we're going to arm you to get ready to have those one-on-one Conversations with your crews that help you better influence them to buy-in to the safety program.

The one thing that will connect your continuous-cash-flow, your long-term investments and and the kind of legacy you leave behind, is safety. Without safety, everything is at risk.

The safety department complains that it’s difficult to get workers to buy-in to safety. But really, is it any wonder that employees don't want to buy-in? I mean, safety has been positioned and promoted as an exercise in paperwork, rules and regulations. And if that's how it's been presented, it should be no surprise that employees resist buying-in to a program of checks, forms and paperwork. Especially the paperwork.

To change that, go to Leadership 101; basic values-based conversations with employees. So, how do you have those conversations that lay out the framework for buying-in to safety? Here are three compelling conversations for supervisors and safety people to have with their crews one-on-one. The purpose of these conversations is to influence better buy-in to safety.

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Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs.

Jul 24, 2017

www.KevBurns.com

On this episode, we are going to test your People-View: how you talk about your crew to other supervisors or even your buddies behind the crew members' backs.

People-view is how you view people. Plain and simple. It's the way that you pre-determine the quality of the people you are working with.

People-view is how you talk about your crew to other supervisors or even your buddies behind the crew members' backs. People-view is the predetermined opinions you have about either the people you work with or those you do business with. That includes job site contractors and subcontractors.

So, how do you view your crews and employees? Here are four self-test questions to help you identify your own people view.

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Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs.

Jul 17, 2017

www.KevBurns.com

If you won't engage crew members on a human level, you will limit both yourself and your crews. On this episode, three places to start to switch your focus from process to people.

Safety people and supervisors who lack a healthy dose of willingness to engage crew members on a human level will limit both themselves and their crews. It doesn’t happen on purpose, but it happens. The inexperienced supervisor who doesn’t know how to motivate and develop individuals on the job, ultimately has a harder time getting the job done. If there is no strategy to continuously improve employees, there’s little chance of improving the organization as a whole, and that includes safety.

How do you as a supervisor or safety person begin to integrate the human factor? Here are the first three areas to set your sights.

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Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs. www.KevBurns.com/PeopleWork

Jul 10, 2017

http://www.kevburns.com

Downloading generic safety messages from the Internet can undermine your own safety program. On this episode, why the phrase "be safe" is a terrible safety message.

Safety people and supervisors get concerned when their employees won't buy-in to safety. They also complain about employees' lack of engagement and a lack of accountability in the safety program. But what if the safety messaging is aimed below the intellect of the same people you're trying to reach? What if you've dumbed it down too far? What if you've underestimated your own people?

Communications that miss the target can undermine your efforts in safety. Generic slogans and feeble safety campaigns downloaded from the Internet do not resonate with most people (Hint: there's a reason they're free for the taking on the Internet). And people do not connect with anything that doesn't resonate with them. A slogan for a slogan’s sake can do more harm than good.

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Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs. www.KevBurns.com/PeopleWork

Jul 3, 2017

http://www.kevburns.com

If you want to improve safety meetings, you have to improve the level of respect you have for your people first. On this episode, three east steps that can transform your safety meetings from boring to engaging - and build respect.

Safety people would make a bigger effort if they got paid for the quality of their safety meetings. But that’s not happening anytime soon. So, for now, you will have to accept that safety meetings are notorious time killers. 

How about you invest a few minutes and give some consideration to some new ideas. Like a good safety meeting, it’ll be short and to the point.

Here are three easy steps that can transform your safety meetings from boring to engaging - and build respect.

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Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs. http://www.kevburns.com/peoplework

Jun 26, 2017

http://www.kevburns.com

The biggest roadblock to safety culture improvement is a lack of focus on safety. On this episode, three ways you can begin to shift the level of focused attention.

Lack of engagement is a problem in every corner of every organization. Safety calls this problem complacency. The biggest roadblock to safety culture improvement is a lack of purposeful focus on safely doing the work.

Here are three ways you can begin to shift the level of focused attention on safety with your crews and employee teams.

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Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs. http://www.kevburns.com/peoplework

Jun 19, 2017

http://www.kevburns.com

If you want to become an effective and respected safety leader, you're going to need to become exceptional with people. On this episode, the top 4 character and personality traits of respected safety leaders.

 

Good people skills have a lot to do with character and personality traits. Good people with great character are just good people-people. They are good with others and they tend to be able to get closer to their co-workers, get trust from them and are put in the enviable position of being a positive influencer of work and morale. So, if you want to become more effective with people, build your character and personality traits. The positive ones of course.

Here are four of the most critical personality traits to have to be able to make you more effective and respected in your supervisory and management duties in safety.

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Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs. http://www.kevburns.com/peoplework

Jun 15, 2017

http://www.kevburns.com

In order for a safety partnership to work, there has to be mutual benefit. On this week's episode, how to build successful safety partnerships with employees and why it's important.

The television shows Shark Tank (USA) and Dragon’s Den (Canada, UK, Australia) feature a panel of investors looking for a great product or idea to get behind. The entrepreneur makes a pitch to the investors. If the pitch is successful, the venture gets backing. If the pitch misses, or if the investors deem that there is too little benefit to them, they won’t invest.

If there is no advantage for an investor, they won’t invest. There has to be a benefit for both partners. And before you can invite employees to become partners in a work project like safety, the benefits of safety have to be clear. In the safety partnership, each partner has to get something out of the deal. So let’s explore ways of building partnerships.

Here are the first three steps into building safety partnerships with employees.

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Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs.

Jun 12, 2017

http://www.kevburns.com

Improve an employee's motivation to do the work and you improve their motivation to do the work safely. On this episode, we will explore four easy steps to improving employees' motivation in safety.

As a front-line safety person or supervisor, you may not be aware of it but you have the greatest impact on employee motivation. In fact, the front-supervisor and safety people have far more influence on safety culture at the front-line than any senior managers ever will. It's true. The things you say, the things you do and the way you engage your people all influence motivation and safety culture.

 

When an employee lacks motivation, there is a corresponding reduction in that employee's willingness to be engaged at work. That affects productivity. Without motivation to give their best, an employee will be more apt to take shortcuts. Shortcuts impact safety. Keep employees focused, engaged and motivated to do their very best and you build a team of high-performers willing to value themselves and each other. The best way to protect their value is by ensuring each others' safety.

Motivation plays a clear role in the level of employee engagement and, subsequently, safety. So with that being said, here are four steps you can take to improve the motivation of your team.

 

Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs.

 

 

May 29, 2017

Episode 27http://www.KevBurns.com

This time around, we are going to focus on building solid performing teams in safety. This is Part 4 and the next 3 of the Traits of Safety Leaders.

To build a solid team requires more than just a collection of good team members. It requires the right mindset from the team leader; in this case, the safety leader. This time, we are going to cover off three new traits that really drive inspiration and motivation to want to contribute to the team.

In the first three parts of this Traits of Safety Leaders series, we covered the first nine traits of safety leaders. So on this episode, we will profile three more traits of safety leaders starting with trait number 10.

Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs.

May 22, 2017

http://www.kevburns.com

Safety improves when engagement improves. Engagement improves when supervisors and safety people make it a point to value the people that they work with. On this episode, 6 areas to start building a better safety culture.

An untrained or under-skilled supervisor or safety person tends to get the basics done. Nothing more. Get production. Stay within the safety rules. Everybody goes home safe (fingers crossed). Job done. Except, the job is not done. In fact, it could be argued that job is systematically being undone. If you’re focused on just getting it done, you may be missing the biggest part of the safety picture.

A 2014 TINYpulse survey revealed the top ten list of things employees want from their work. Number 7 was money. There are six things that are more important to employees at work than money. Give employees these 6 things and you begin to change the corporate culture. Once you begin to shift the corporate culture, safety culture shifts with it. Supervisors and safety people have a great deal of control over both.

Here is the list of six things that employees want more than money and what it means to safety.

Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs. Learn moire about Kevin's book at http://www.kevburns.com/peoplework

May 15, 2017

Episode 25http://www.kevburns.com

Helping employees overcome their tolerance to safety rules paves the way for them to see their own win for buying-in to safety. On this week's episode, how tolerance to safety rules may be worse that complacency.

 

Tolerance should become a serious consideration for supervisors and safety people. We all know that there has been plenty of talk about the hazards of complacency in safety. And the whole complacency conversation is gaining attention. But when you look for the actual definition of complacency, what you read may surprise you. Here's what the Merriam-Webster dictionary had to say about complacency: Complacency is self-satisfaction especially when accompanied by unawareness of actual dangers or deficiencies. In other words, when people get comfortable with their performance, they may pay less attention to risks. And when people are satisfied with their performance, there is a risk of complacency.

Tolerance, on the other hand, is the willingness to endure rules and procedures no matter how annoying they may be or how much you may disagree with something. When safety becomes an annoyance that needs to be tolerated, you are moving away from building a strong safety culture.

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Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs. http://www.kevburns.com/peoplework

May 8, 2017

Ep 24 - Effects of Respect, Optimism and Happiness on Safety Leadership

On this episode, we will explore more of the Traits of Safety Leadership. This is Part 3. This time, the Effects of Optimism, Respect and Happiness.

Nothing affects an employee’s engagement levels more than the supervisor or manager (including safety people). The example set by the supervisor, safety person or manager is key to establishing the tone and culture of safety at work.

Overbearing, critical and negative-focused supervisors can take their toll on employees. And these supervisors and managers cause employees to lose their motivation.

This week, I want to offer you three softer skills that can connect you to employees in a way that gives them what they want from the job. This will help you build a better team relationship and create more influence in buying-in to safety.

Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs.

Buy Kevin's book PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety

May 1, 2017

Episode 23Ep 023 - Traits of Safety Leaders - Part 02

We are continuing to talk about the traits of safety leadership and on this episode, the next three traits you need to acquire. Safety leadership has little to do with position or title. You don't need to be in a management or in any kind of a supervisory position to be a leader. In fact, some of the best leaders are just ordinary employees who happen to be extraordinary people. They just happen to possess certain personality traits.

Safety leadership is about the decisions you make and the example you set for others to follow. To become a leader requires more than how many years you've been on the job or what kind of seniority you have in the company. Leadership is the right collection of specific personal skills and traits that is led by a lifelong commitment to self-improvement. Leadership is about being outward-focused; your level concerned about the well-being of others and how you help them to be better.

In the last episode we featured the first three traits of safety leadership. So, on this episode, we start at #4.

Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs.

Apr 24, 2017

Episode 22Do you have the traits of a safety leader? Let's start to find out. On this episode, the first of a series of podcasts on the traits of safety leaders.

Leadership requires no title or position. In fact, some of the best workplace leaders are just ordinary employees who happen to possess certain traits that causes others to look up to them and to seek their advice. Leaders are not managers necessarily although some management people may actually have many of leadership skills that this series of episodes is going to outline.

Do you have the traits of a safety leader? Why not use this series of episodes on safety leadership as a self-assessment tool to determine how well you score? Here are the first three traits of safety leaders.

Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs. http://www.kevburns.com

Apr 17, 2017

Are you aware that a front-line supervisor has more influence on safety performance than senior management? On this episode, we're going to discuss how front-line safety leaders can harness that influence to improve safety culture.

The front-line supervisor, as the name would imply, lives at the front-line. And as a result, the front-line supervisor has more frequent contact with front-line employees - far more contact than anyone in a senior management position. That affords them the opportunity to have more influence in the safety culture at the front-line than senior management ever would.

For the supervisor, it’s imperative that they understand that authority and influence are two very different things. Anyone can be the boss and throw their authority weight around. That takes no skill or talent ... or even confidence when you think about. Influence, though, takes a lot of skill and the right mindset. So, what comes first? Skill or mindset? I would say mindset because it will determine how you acquire your skills.

Here are three strategies to adjust your mindset so that you, as a front-line supervisor or safety person, a safety leader, can develop better influence.

Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs.

Apr 10, 2017

Two years is a long time to be trying to get it right as a supervisor. Especially when it comes to safety. On this episode, the three C's to becoming a better safety supervisor.

Does your workplace take the most senior employee in a crew and promote that person into a supervisory position? And then leave them to hang without skills, training and basic supervisory tools? Has it maybe happened to you?

You know, there's a sense of irony that your company requires any employee or contractor on your job site to have proper training to operate a piece of machinery? But to supervise the people who are actually operating the machinery doesn't require any supervisory training?

Workplaces want their supervisors to mentor and coach the younger, less-experienced workers. But a lot of those same supervisors don’t get the skills and tools to do the job with any kind of competence. It can take a new supervisor up to two years to find his or her own workable management style.

So, let's see if we can't shorten that two-year curve. Here is a 3-part formula to improve your effectiveness as a supervisor or safety person. Each part of the formula starts with the letter C.

Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs.

Mar 30, 2017

http://www.kevburns.com

One of the most pursued issues by safety people is getting employees to commit to the safety program. On this episode, 3 ways to get better commitment to safety. 

You need commitment to safety from especially the front line employees. Here's why. The majority of safety incidents happen at the front line. The largest numbers of workers are at the front line. The most amount of activity is at the front line. And so it's at the front line where the focus on safety needs to take place. It is at the front line where safety leadership is needed most.

Now, let’s be clear. Leadership is not another word for management, even though managers hijack the word and use it interchangeably with their own title. The truth is, you don’t need to have a management title to be a leader. In fact, some of the best job-site leaders have no title at all.

Every employee is quite capable of demonstrating some form of safety leadership. There are three more areas where you can get to work to build employee commitment to safety.

Kevin Burns is a management consultant, safety speaker and author of "PeopleWork: The Human Touch in Workplace Safety." He is an expert in how to engage people in safety and believes that the best place to work is always the safest place to work. Kevin helps organizations integrate caring for and valuing employees through their safety programs.

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